Solid ECN Securities | Best Place to Trade CFD Products

SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
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Cyclical and Non-Cyclical Stocks​

Cyclical stocks are directly affected by the economy's performance and typically follow economic cycles of expansion, peak, recession, and recovery. They usually display more volatility and outperform other stocks in times of economic strength when consumers have more discretionary income. Examples of cyclical stocks include iPhone maker Apple Inc. (AAPL) and sports gear giant Nike, Inc. (NKE). Investors can add cyclical stocks to their portfolios by purchasing the Vanguard Consumer Discretionary ETF (VCR).

On the other hand, non-cyclical stocks operate in "recession-proof" industries that tend to perform reasonably well irrespective of the economy. Non-cyclical stocks usually outperform cyclical stocks in an economic slowdown or downturn as demand for core products and services remains relatively consistent. The Vanguard Consumer Staples ETF (VDC) provides exposure to large-cap defensive stocks like personal care giant The Procter & Gamble Company (PG), as well as beverage makers PepsiCo, Inc. (PEP) and The Coca-Cola Company (KO).​

Defensive Stocks​

Defensive stocks generally provide consistent returns in most economic conditions and stock market environments. These companies typically sell essential products and services, such as consumer staples, healthcare, and utilities. Defensive stocks may help protect a portfolio from steep losses during a sell-off or bear market. A defensive stock may also be a value, income, non-cyclical, or blue-chip stock. Telecommunications giant AT&T Inc. (T) and healthcare multinational Cardinal Health, Inc. (CAH) are among the defensive stocks included in the core holdings of the Invesco Defensive Equity ETF (DEF).

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Defensive stocks are less likely to face bankruptcy because of their ability to generate consistent returns during periods of economic weakness.​

IPO Stock​

When a company goes public, it issues stock through an initial public offering (IPO). IPO stock typically gets allocated at a discount before the company's stock lists on the stock exchange. It may also have a vesting schedule to prevent investors from selling all of their shares when the stock commences trading. Market commentators also use the term "IPO stocks" when referring to recently listed stocks. Investors can monitor for upcoming IPOs through the Nasdaq website.

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Penny Stocks​

A penny stock is equity valued at less than $5 and is considered highly speculative. Although some penny stocks trade on major exchanges, many trade through the OTCQB—a middle-tier over-the-counter (OTC) market for U.S. stocks operated by OTC Markets Group.9 Investors should consider using limit orders when placing buy and sell orders in penny stock, as they often have a large spread between the bid and ask price.

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Penny stocks shot to prominence in popular culture after the release of The Wolf of Wall Street, a movie about a former stockbroker who operated a penny stock scam. Investors who want to take a bet on penny stocks should look at the iShares Micro-Cap ETF (IWC).

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Solid ECN brings vital advantages for forex traders in the US, EU, and beyond. High levels of transparency mean price manipulation is impossible
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SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
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They're easy to invest in, have low fees, and often perform very well

With a net worth of more than $82 billion, Warren Buffett is one of the most successful investors of all time. His investing style, which is based on discipline, value, and patience, has yielded results that have consistently outperformed the market for decades. While regular investors—that is, the rest of us—don’t have the money to invest the way Buffett does, we can follow his one of his ongoing recommendations: Low-cost index funds are the smartest investment most people can make.

As Buffett wrote in a 2016 letter to shareholders, “When trillions of dollars are managed by Wall Streeters charging high fees, it will usually be the managers who reap outsized profits, not the clients. Both large and small investors should stick with low-cost index funds.”

If you’re thinking about taking his advice, here’s what you need to know about investing in index funds.

What Is an Index Fund?
An index fund is a type of mutual fund or exchange-traded fund (ETF) that holds all (or a representative sample) of the securities in a specific index, with the goal of matching the performance of that benchmark as closely as possible. The S&P 500 is perhaps the most well-known index, but there are indexes—and index funds—for nearly every market and investment strategy you can think of. You can buy index funds through your brokerage account or directly from an index-fund provider, such as BlackRock or Vanguard.

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When you buy an index fund, you get a diversified selection of securities in one easy, low-cost investment. Some index funds provide exposure to thousands of securities in a single fund, which helps lower your overall risk through broad diversification. By investing in several index funds tracking different indexes you can built a portfolio that matches your desired asset allocation. For example, you might put 60% of your money in stock index funds and 40% in bond index funds.

The Benefits of Index Funds
The most obvious advantage of index funds is that they have consistently beaten other types of funds in terms of total return.

One major reason is that they generally have much lower management fees than other funds because they are passively managed. Instead of having a manager actively trading, and a research team analyzing securities and making recommendations, the index fund’s portfolio just duplicates that of its designated index. Index funds hold investments until the index itself changes (which doesn’t happen very often), so they also have lower transaction costs. Those lower costs can make a big difference in your returns, especially over the long haul.

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“Huge institutional investors, viewed as a group, have long underperformed the unsophisticated index-fund investor who simply sits tight for decades,” wrote Buffett in his 2014 shareholder letter. “A major reason has been fees: Many institutions pay substantial sums to consultants who, in turn, recommend high-fee managers. And that is a fool’s game.” What's more, by trading in and out of securities less frequently than actively managed fund do, index funds generate less taxable income that must be passed along to their shareholders.

Index funds have still another tax advantage. Because they buy new lots of securities in the index whenever investors put money into the fund, they may have hundreds or thousands of lots to choose from when selling a particular security. That means they can sell the lots with the lowest capital gains and, therefore, the lowest tax bite.​
 

SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
etf-1.png


They're easy to invest in, have low fees, and often perform very well

With a net worth of more than $82 billion, Warren Buffett is one of the most successful investors of all time. His investing style, which is based on discipline, value, and patience, has yielded results that have consistently outperformed the market for decades. While regular investors—that is, the rest of us—don’t have the money to invest the way Buffett does, we can follow his one of his ongoing recommendations: Low-cost index funds are the smartest investment most people can make.

As Buffett wrote in a 2016 letter to shareholders, “When trillions of dollars are managed by Wall Streeters charging high fees, it will usually be the managers who reap outsized profits, not the clients. Both large and small investors should stick with low-cost index funds.”

If you’re thinking about taking his advice, here’s what you need to know about investing in index funds.

What Is an Index Fund?
An index fund is a type of mutual fund or exchange-traded fund (ETF) that holds all (or a representative sample) of the securities in a specific index, with the goal of matching the performance of that benchmark as closely as possible. The S&P 500 is perhaps the most well-known index, but there are indexes—and index funds—for nearly every market and investment strategy you can think of. You can buy index funds through your brokerage account or directly from an index-fund provider, such as BlackRock or Vanguard.

etf-2.png


When you buy an index fund, you get a diversified selection of securities in one easy, low-cost investment. Some index funds provide exposure to thousands of securities in a single fund, which helps lower your overall risk through broad diversification. By investing in several index funds tracking different indexes you can built a portfolio that matches your desired asset allocation. For example, you might put 60% of your money in stock index funds and 40% in bond index funds.

The Benefits of Index Funds
The most obvious advantage of index funds is that they have consistently beaten other types of funds in terms of total return.

One major reason is that they generally have much lower management fees than other funds because they are passively managed. Instead of having a manager actively trading, and a research team analyzing securities and making recommendations, the index fund’s portfolio just duplicates that of its designated index. Index funds hold investments until the index itself changes (which doesn’t happen very often), so they also have lower transaction costs. Those lower costs can make a big difference in your returns, especially over the long haul.

etf-3.png


“Huge institutional investors, viewed as a group, have long underperformed the unsophisticated index-fund investor who simply sits tight for decades,” wrote Buffett in his 2014 shareholder letter. “A major reason has been fees: Many institutions pay substantial sums to consultants who, in turn, recommend high-fee managers. And that is a fool’s game.” What's more, by trading in and out of securities less frequently than actively managed fund do, index funds generate less taxable income that must be passed along to their shareholders.

Index funds have still another tax advantage. Because they buy new lots of securities in the index whenever investors put money into the fund, they may have hundreds or thousands of lots to choose from when selling a particular security. That means they can sell the lots with the lowest capital gains and, therefore, the lowest tax bite.​
 

SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
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A spread can have several meanings in finance. Generally, the spread refers to the difference between two prices, rates, or yields. In one of the most common definitions, the spread is the gap between the bid and the ask prices of a security or asset, like a stock, bond, or commodity. This is known as a bid-ask spread.

In finance, a spread refers to the difference between two prices, rates, or yields
One of the most common types is the bid-ask spread, which refers to the gap between the bid (from buyers) and the ask (from sellers) prices of a security or asset
Spread can also refer to the difference in a trading position – the gap between a short position (that is, selling) in one futures contract or currency and a long position (that is, buying) in another​

Understanding Spread

Spread can also refer to the difference in a trading position – the gap between a short position (that is, selling) in one futures contract or currency and a long position (that is, buying) in another. This is officially known as a spread trade.

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In underwriting, the spread can mean the difference between the amount paid to the issuer of a security and the price paid by the investor for that security—that is, the cost an underwriter pays to buy an issue, compared to the price at which the underwriter sells it to the public.

In lending, the spread can also refer to the price a borrower pays above a benchmark yield to get a loan. If the prime interest rate is 3%, for example, and a borrower gets a mortgage charging a 5% rate, the spread is 2%.

The bid-ask spread is also known as the bid-offer spread and buy-sell. This sort of asset spread is influenced by a number of factors:​
  • Supply or "float" (the total number of shares outstanding that are available to trade)​
  • Demand or interest in a stock​
  • Total trading activity of the stock​
  • For securities like futures contracts, options, currency pairs, and stocks, the bid-offer spread is the difference between the prices given for an immediate order—the ask—and an immediate sale – the bid. For a stock option, the spread would be the difference between the strike price and the market value.​
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One of the uses of the bid-ask spread is to measure the liquidity of the market and the size of the transaction cost of the stock. For example, on Jan. 11, 2022, the bid price for Alphabet Inc., Google's parent company, was $2,790.86 and the ask price was $2,795.47.1 The spread is $4.61. This indicates that Alphabet is a highly liquid stock, with considerable trading volume.

The spread trade is also called the relative value trade. Spread trades are the act of purchasing one security and selling another related security as a unit. Usually, spread trades are done with options or futures contracts. These trades are executed to produce an overall net trade with a positive value called the spread.

Spreads are priced as a unit or as pairs in future exchanges to ensure the simultaneous buying and selling of a security. Doing so eliminates execution risk wherein one part of the pair executes but another part fails.​


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SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
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A long-term investment strategy is one that entails holding investments for more than a full year. This strategy includes holding assets like bonds, stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, and more. Individuals who take a long-term approach require discipline and patience, That's because investors must be able to take on a certain amount of risk while they wait for higher rewards down the road.

Many market experts recommend holding stocks for the long term. The S&P 500 experienced losses in only 11 of the 47 years from 1975 to 2022, making stock market returns quite volatile in shorter time frames.1 However, investors have historically experienced a much higher rate of success over the longer term.

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In a low-interest rate environment, investors may be tempted to dabble in stocks to boost short-term returns, but it makes more sense—and pays out higher overall returns—to hold on to stocks for the long term. In this article, we show how you may be able to benefit from holding stocks for a longer period of time.​
  • Long-term investments almost always outperform the market when investors try and time their holdings.​
  • Emotional trading tends to hamper investor returns.​
  • The S&P 500 posted positive returns for investors over most 20-year time periods.​
  • Riding out temporary market downswings is considered a sign of a good investor.​
  • Investing long-term cuts down on costs and allows you to compound any earnings you receive from dividends.​

Better Long-Term Returns
The term asset class refers to a specific category of investments. They share the same characteristics and qualities, such as fixed-income assets (bonds) or equities, which are commonly called stocks. The asset class that's best for you depends on several factors, including your age, risk profile and tolerance, investment goals, and the amount of capital you have. But which asset classes are best for long-term investors?

If we look at several decades of asset class returns, we find that stocks have generally outperformed almost all other asset classes. The S&P 500 returned an average of 11.82% per year between 1928 and 2021. This compares favorably to the 3.33% return of three-month Treasury bills (T-bills) and the 5.11% return of 10-year Treasury notes.

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Emerging markets have some of the highest return potentials in the equity markets, but also carry the highest degree of risk. This class historically earned high average annual returns but short-term fluctuations have impacted their performance. For instance, the 10-year annualized return of the MSCI Emerging Markets Index was 2.89% as of April 29, 2022.3

Small and large caps have also delivered above-average returns. For instance, the 10-year return for the Russell 2000 index, which measures the performance of 2,000 small companies, was 10.15%.4 The large-cap Russell 1000 index had an average return of 13.57% for the last 10 years, as of May 3, 2022.56​

Ride Out Highs and Lows
Stocks are considered to be long-term investments. This is, in part, because it's not unusual for stocks to drop 10% to 20% or more in value over a shorter period of time. Investors have the opportunity to ride out some of these highs and lows over a period of many years or even decades to generate a better long-term return.

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Looking back at stock market returns since the 1920s, individuals have rarely lost money investing in the S&P 500 for a 20-year time period. Even considering setbacks, such as the Great Depression, Black Monday, the tech bubble, and the financial crisis, investors would have experienced gains had they made an investment in the S&P 500 and held it uninterrupted for 20 years.

While past results are no guarantee of future returns, it does suggest that long-term investing in stocks generally yields positive results, if given enough time.

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Solid ECN brings vital advantages for forex traders in the US, EU, and beyond. High levels of transparency mean price manipulation is impossible
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SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
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Investors Are Poor Market Timers
Let's face it, we're not as calm and rational as we claim to be. In fact, one of the inherent flaws in investor behavior is the tendency to be emotional. Many individuals claim to be long-term investors until the stock market begins falling, which is when they tend to withdraw their money to avoid additional losses.

Many investors fail to remain invested in stocks when a rebound occurs. In fact, they tend to jump back in only when most of the gains have already been achieved. This type of buy high, sell low behavior tends to cripple investor returns.

According to Dalbar's Quantitative Analysis of Investor Behavior study, the S&P 500 had an average annual return of just over 6% during the 20-year period ending Dec. 31, 2019. During the same time frame, the average investor experienced an average annual return of about 2.5%.

There are a few reasons why this happens. Here are just a couple of them:​
  • Investors have a fear of regret. People often fail to trust their own judgment and follow the hype instead, especially when markets drop. People tend to fall into the trap that they'll regret holding onto stocks and lose a lot more money because they drop in value so they end up selling them to assuage that fear.​
  • A sense of pessimism when things change. Optimism prevails during market rallies but the opposite is true when things turn sour. The market may experience fluctuations because of short-term surprise shocks, such as those related to the economy. But it's important to remember that these upsets are often short-lived and things will very likely turn around.​
  • Investors who pay too much attention to the stock market tend to handicap their chances of success by trying to time the market too frequently. A simple long-term buy-and-hold strategy would have yielded far better results.​

Lower Capital Gains Tax Rate
Profits that result from the sale of any capital assets end up in a capital gain. This includes any personal assets, such as furniture, or investments like stocks, bonds, and real estate.

An investor who sells a security within one calendar year of buying it gets any gains taxed as ordinary income. These are referred to as short-term capital gains. Depending on the individual's adjusted gross income (AGI), this tax rate could be as high as 37%.

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Any securities that are sold after being held for more than a year result in long-term capital gains. The gains are taxed at a maximum rate of just 20%. Investors in lower tax brackets may even qualify for a 0% long-term capital gains tax rate.

Less Costly
One of the main benefits of a long-term investment approach is money. Keeping your stocks in your portfolio longer is more cost-effective than regular buying and selling because the longer you hold your investments, the fewer fees you have to pay. But how much does this all cost?

As we discussed in the last section, you save on taxes. Any gains from stock sales must be reported to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). That ends up increasing your tax liability, which means more money out of your pocket. Remember, short-term capital gains can cost you more than if you hold your stocks for a longer period of time.

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Then there are trading or transaction fees. How much you pay depends on the type of account you have and the investment firm that handles your portfolio. For instance, you may be charged a commission or markup, where the former is deducted when you buy and sell through a broker while markups are charged when the sale is directed through their own inventory. These costs are charged to your account whenever you trade stocks. This means your portfolio balance will drop with every sale you make.

Firms often charge ongoing fees, such as account maintenance charges, that can also put a dent in your account balance. So if you're a regular trader who has a short-term goal, your fees will add up even more when you factor in transaction fees.

Compounding With Dividend Stocks
Dividends are corporate profits distributed by companies with a track record of success. These tend to be blue chips or defensive stocks. Defensive stocks are companies that do well regardless of how the economy performs or when the stock market drops.

These companies pay regular dividends—usually every quarter—to eligible shareholders, which means that you get to share in their success. While it may be tempting to cash them out, there's a very good reason why you should reinvest the dividends into the companies that actually pay them.

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If you own any bonds or mutual funds, you'll know about how compound interest affects your investments. Compound interest is any interest calculated on the principal balance of your stock portfolio and any earlier interest you earned. This means that any interest (or dividends) that your stock portfolio accumulates compounds over time, thereby increasing the amount of your account in the long run.​

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Solid ECN brings vital advantages for forex traders in the US, EU, and beyond. High levels of transparency mean price manipulation is impossible
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SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
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Have you ever wondered what happened to your socks when you put them into the dryer and then never saw them again? It's an unexplained mystery that may never have an answer. Many people feel the same way when they suddenly find that their brokerage account balance has taken a nosedive. Where did that money go?

Fortunately, money that is gained or lost on a stock doesn't just disappear. Read to find out what happens to it and what causes it.​
  • When a stock tumbles and an investor loses money, the money doesn't get redistributed to someone else.​
  • Essentially, it has disappeared into thin air, reflecting dwindling investor interest and a decline in investor perception of the stock.​
  • That's because stock prices are determined by supply and demand and investor perception of value and viability.​
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Disappearing Money
Before we get to how money disappears, it is important to understand that regardless of whether the market is rising–called a bull market–or falling–called a bear market–supply and demand drive the price of stocks. And it's the fluctuations in stock prices that determines whether you make money or lose it.

Buy and Sell Trades
If you purchase a stock for $10 and sell it for only $5, you will lose $5 per share. It may feel like that money must go to someone else, but that isn't exactly true. It doesn't go to the person who buys the stock from you.

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For example, let's say you were thinking of buying a stock at $15, and before you decide to buy it, the stock falls to $10 per share. You decide to purchase at $10, but you didn't gain the $5 depreciation in the stock price. Instead, you got the stock at the current market value of $10 per share. In your mind, you saved $5, but you didn't actually earn a $5 profit. However, if the stock rises from $10 back to $15, you have a $5 gain, but it has to move back higher for you to gain the $5 per share.

The same is true if you're holding a stock and the price drops, leading you to sell it for a loss. The person buying it at that lower price–the price you sold it for–doesn't necessarily profit from your loss and must wait for the stock to rise before making a profit.

The company that issued the stock doesn't get the money from your declining stock price either.



There are investors who place trades with a broker to sell a stock at a perceived high price with the expectation that it'll decline. These are called short-selling trades. If the stock price falls, the short seller profits by buying the stock at the lower price–closing out the trade. The net difference between the sale and buy prices is settled with the broker. Although short-sellers are profiting from a declining price, they're not taking your money when you lose on a stock sale. Instead, they're doing independent transactions with the market and have just as much of a chance to lose or be wrong on their trade as investors who own the stock.

In other words, short-sellers profit on price declines, but it's a separate transaction from bullish investors who bought the stock and are losing money because the price is declining.​

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Solid ECN brings vital advantages for forex traders in the US, EU, and beyond. High levels of transparency mean price manipulation is impossible
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Ak04

Trader
May 31, 2022
34
7
19
24
Hello Zane, I'm looking for a respectable offshore ECN broker. and have some questions.

It's very rare to for a true ECN to offer more than 100 even 50, how is that you offer that 1000?

If I have an account with SolidECN will I be traded against? I can very well tell when this happens.

I don't mean to put you on the spot, but I do want to hold you accountable like a small handful of offshore brokers that advertised similar.
 
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Reactions: SOLIDECN

SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
Hello Zane, I'm looking for a respectable offshore ECN broker. and have some questions.

It's very rare to for a true ECN to offer more than 100 even 50, how is that you offer that 1000?

If I have an account with SolidECN will I be traded against? I can very well tell when this happens.

I don't mean to put you on the spot, but I do want to hold you accountable like a small handful of offshore brokers that advertised similar.​

Hello,

Thank you for sharing your concerns with the community.

Almost every broker have an offshore branch/office and most of their clients are onboarded in their offshore branch. Our liquidity provider allow us to offer 1:1000 leverage but to account with a balance less than $1,000. Please see the leverage table below:

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All trades are being executed in the market. This policy helps us to provide a true and fast ECN trading environment traders worldwide. Today, regulations are categorizing traders based on their nationality where Solid ECN treats all traders the same.

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to share.​
 

Ak04

Trader
May 31, 2022
34
7
19
24

Hello,

Thank you for sharing your concerns with the community.

Almost every broker have an offshore branch/office and most of their clients are onboarded in their offshore branch. Our liquidity provide....​
Appreciate the response. Does your liquidity provider or Solid ECN actively trade against its clients' positions?
 

SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
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The S&P 500 Index has long been one of the best-known proxies for the U.S. stock market, and several mutual funds and exchange traded funds (ETFs) that passively track the index have become popular investment vehicles. These funds do not seek to outperform the index through active trading, stock picking, or market timing; instead, relying on the inherent diversification of the broad index to generate returns.

Indeed, over long-term horizons, the index typically produces better returns than actively managed portfolios, especially after taking into account taxes and fees. So, what if you had just held the S&P 500, using an index fund or some other means of holding the stocks in it?

> The S&P 500 Index is a broad-based measure of large corporations traded on U.S. stock markets.
> Over long periods of time, passively holding the index often produces better results than actively trading or picking single stocks.
> Over long-term horizons, the index typically produces better returns than actively managed portfolios.

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What If You Had Invested in Just the S&P 500?
People often use the S&P 500 as a yardstick for investing success. Active traders or stock-picking investors are often judged against this benchmark in hindsight to evaluate their savvy.

Let's take a historical example: Soon after Donald Trump entered the race for the Republican nomination for president, the press zeroed in on his net worth. Financial experts have pegged his net worth at $2.5 billion. One of the cornerstones of Trump's campaign was his success as a businessperson and his ability to create such wealth. However, financial experts have pointed out that if Trump had liquidated his real estate holdings—estimated to be worth $500 million—back in 1987, and invested them in the S&P 500 Index, his net worth could be as much as $13 billion.

It is just one more example of how the S&P 500 Index continues to be held up as the standard by which all investment performances are measured. Investment managers are paid a lot of money to generate returns for their portfolios that beat the S&P 500, yet on average, most don't.

This is the reason why an increasing number of investors are turning to index funds and ETFs that simply try to match the performance of this index. If Trump had done so back in 1987, he would have made 26 times his money for an average annualized return of 12.3% by the time he was inaugurated (from 1987 to 2015—the date of calculation for projected net worth). But hindsight is 20/20, and he could not have known that.

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Solid ECN brings vital advantages for forex traders in the US, EU, and beyond. High levels of transparency mean price manipulation is impossible
solidecn.com

 

SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
3,337
22
54
39
Okay, thanks for that.

Are you an A and B book/hybrid broker?

Thanks

Hi,

Solid ECN Securities is a neat A Book broker.
Post automatically merged:

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Another major factor in annual returns for an investor in the S&P 500 is when they choose to enter the market. For example, the SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (SPY), which basically duplicates the index, performed very well for an investor who bought between 1996 and 2000 but experienced a consistent downward trend from 2000 to 2002.

Investors who buy during market lows and hold their investment, or sell at market highs, will experience larger returns than investors who buy during market highs, particularly if they then sell during dips.

It's clear that the timing of a stock purchase plays a role in its returns. For those who want to avoid the missed opportunity of selling during market lows, but don't want the risk of active trading, dollar-cost averaging is an option.

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What Is the S&P 500 Index?
The S&P 500 Index is a collection of stocks intended to reflect the overall return characteristics of the stock market as a whole. The stocks that make up the S&P 500 are selected by market capitalization, liquidity, and industry. Companies to be included in the S&P are selected by the S&P 500 Index Committee, which consists of a group of analysts employed by Standard & Poor's.

The index primarily mirrors the overall performance of large-cap stocks. The S&P 500 is considered by analysts to be a leading economic indicator for both the stock market and the U.S. economy. The 30 stocks that make up the Dow Jones Industrial Average were previously considered the primary benchmark indicator for U.S. equities, but the S&P 500, a much larger and more diverse group of stocks, has supplanted it in that role over time.

It's difficult for most individual investors to actually be invested in the S&P 500 themselves since that would involve buying 500 individual stocks. However, investors can easily mirror the index's performance by investing in an S&P 500 Index exchange-traded fund, which duplicates the index's holdings in its portfolio and so corresponds to its return and yield. Since ETFs are frequently recommended for beginning and risk-averse investors, the S&P 500 is a popular choice for many investors trying to capture a diversified selection of the market.​

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Solid ECN brings vital advantages for forex traders in the US, EU, and beyond. High levels of transparency mean price manipulation is impossible
solidecn.com

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Ak04

Trader
May 31, 2022
34
7
19
24
That's nice to know, thanks for that response.

Do the traders of Solid ECN get trader profiled in order to hedge them?
 

Ak04

Trader
May 31, 2022
34
7
19
24
No we don't have a trading desk. All trades are sent to the liquidity providers.

Okay, can you disclose who the liquidity providers are by chance, are they regulated prime brokers or someone else?

-separately-

On a different note, had an odd experience.

Was up some pizza party money on a position and as soon as it started to move the chart feed froze up....Just that particular pair, all the other pairs I could pull up charts.

I tried opening up different time frames of the pair in question and all would just give me the big bold green lettering of the pair and time frame - no chart.

After several restarts, nothing. All the other pairs were pulling up. Coincidentally after most of the profit was taken back the feed came back on line...

I ended up closing the small position on the trial account. I guess it was a technical glitch.
 
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SOLIDECN

Master Trader
Nov 16, 2021
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Okay, can you disclose who the liquidity providers are by chance, are they regulated prime brokers or someone else?

-separately-

On a different note, had an odd experience.

Was up some pizza party money on a position and as soon as it started to move the chart feed froze up....Just that particular pair, all the other pairs I could pull up charts.

I tried opening up different time frames of the pair in question and all would just give me the big bold green lettering of the pair and time frame - no chart.

After several restarts, nothing. All the other pairs were pulling up. Coincidentally after most of the profit was taken back the feed came back on line...

I ended up closing the small position on the trial account. I guess it was a technical glitch.​

Hi,

We are sorry to hear about your experience with your demo account.

Our professional staff tried to assist you using Team Viewer to check the issue. I wish you would have shared your registration email address or your demo account number so we could investigate it. I'm afraid we were blindsided by the lack of information, and we couldn't grasp the concept of the big bold green letters.

We sent you several screenshots from the pair and the market watch on spot showing everything is running smoothly. Please make sure you download the latest MT5 version from our website. MetaQuotes had an update today so please double check if you are with the latest MT5 version.

Feel free to share more information. We will be glad to help.​