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Canadian Dollar Flat As Retail Sales Collapse in April, Finds Support in Crude

The Canadian dollar is trading relatively flat against many of its currency competitors to finish the trading week. The latest economic data showed just how severe the coronavirus pandemic lockdown was to the Great White North, but the increase in crude oil prices helped limit any of the loonie’s losses.

Chinese Yuan Slips As All Eyes on Auction of Special Treasury Bonds

The Chinese yuan is slightly weakening ahead of Beijing’s auction of one trillion yuan ($141 billion) in special treasury bonds to help cover the cost of combating the coronavirus pandemic. Investors are all eyes on the event to see how it would impact market liquidity. Mixed economic data are also affecting the yuan’s performance against currency rivals to start the trading week.

Canadian Dollar Rallies on Inflation Report, Crashes on BoC Rate Decision

The Canadian dollar today rallied against its US counterpart in the first half of today’s session driving the USD/CAD to its daily lows boosted by in-line inflation figures. However, the currency pair quickly reversed course after the Bank of Canada announced its rate decision, which was interpreted as being very dovish.

Canadian Dollar Dips As Economy Contracts In October

The Canadian dollar is trading a bit lower against multiple currency competitors to start the trading week, driven by a recent string of disappointing economic numbers, including a surprising economic contraction in October. The loonie has still been one of the best-performing currencies among G20 nations, but anemic growth could affect its performance heading into 2020.

Canadian Dollar Flat on Lower Weekly Earnings, Drop in Wholesale Sales

The Canadian dollar is trading relatively flat against most currency rivals on Thursday as traders digest the newest data that offer a mixed portrait of the national economy. The modest gain in crude oil prices could not lift the loonie higher toward the end of the trading week.

Canadian Dollar Mixed on October Jobs Report, Housing Fallout

The Canadian dollar is failing to rebound to kick off the trading week as the currency was stung by a disappointing October jobs report on Friday. The loonie was further hampered by slumping housing numbers. Is the Canadian economy at a standstill or is there room for growth?

Canadian Dollar Falls Against US Peer on Weak Crude Oil Prices

The Canadian dollar today broke down against the US dollar as global crude oil prices fell following the absence of more output cuts by the OPEC and its allies at today’s meeting. The USD/CAD rallied higher during the American session as oil prices fell causing the commodity-linked loonie to weaken against the greenback.

Chinese Yuan Mixed on Weaker Industrial Output, Surging Home Prices

The Chinese yuan is having a mixed trading session against multiple currencies, driven by varied economic data. The biggest story for China was its July industrial production being worse than what the market had expected, though it was somewhat offset by soaring housing prices in the world’s second-largest economy. The yuan may not be able to strengthen against a basket of currencies until the trade war is finally over.

Canadian Dollar Falls As Economy Sheds Jobs, Raises Unemployment Rate

The Canadian dollar is sliding against several major currency rivals to finish out the trading week. The loonie’s descent was driven by a mostly disappointing labor report that saw the economy experience its weakest three-month period of job creation in more than a year. Housing numbers were also down, though many of them were better than what the market had anticipated.

Canadian Dollar Mixed on Housing Data, Upcoming BOC Decision

The Canadian dollar is mixed against a basket of currencies on Tuesday, driven primarily by housing data that pleased and displeased investors. The loonie is also waiting for the Bank of Canada (BOC)’s decision on interest rates this week that will either mirror its American counterpart or adopt a wait-and-see approach.

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