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Japanese Yen JPY

 

Detailed information and fundamental factors

Central Bank: Bank of Japan

Interest Rate: -0.10%

Public Debt to GDP Ratio, 2017: 223.8%

Trade Balance, 2017: $57.6 bln.

Inflation, 2017: 0.4%

Sovereign Credit Ratings:

Fitch
A
Stable
Moody's
A1
Stable
S&P
A+
Positive

Supporting Factors

Global reserve currency

weak

Safe haven currency

strong

Factors of Weakness

Loose monetary policy

medium

Frequent currency interventions

strong

The yen is the official currency of Japan. It was introduced in 1871 and allowed to freely float at 1973. The yen is the third major reserve currency after the dollar and the euro. The yen is considered a safe currency; therefore it is sought by traders in times of uncertainty and instability. Low interest rates in Japan (near zero), combined with high liquidity of the currency, make the yen used in the practice called carry trade.



Japanese Yen News Archive

Japanese Yen Weak on Risk Appetite, Disappointing CPI Release

The Japanese yen fell against majority of its most-traded peers today due to risk appetite prevailing on markets. Disappointing inflation report was not helping the currency either.

Japanese Yen Rises As BOJ Keeps Rosy Economic Picture

The Japanese yen is gaining against its major currency rivals on Thursday as reports suggest that the Bank of Japan (BOJ) will maintain a bright view of the national economy, despite a myriad of factors suggesting that Tokyo is expected to record disappointing data.

Japanese Yen Rallies on Poor Data from China, Trims Gains Later

The Japanese yen rallied against its most-traded rivals today on bad macroeconomic releases in China and uncertainty about the situation in Great Britain. By now, the currency has trimmed its gains, losing them against some of the peers outright.

Japanese Yen Strengthens As Longest Expansion Since WWII Nears

The Japanese yen is strengthening against its American counterpart midweek as the world’s third-largest economy is on track for its longest expansion since the Second World War. On the data front, there were plenty of positives to whet the appetite of Japanese investors. With the US-Japan trade negotiations on the horizon, markets may be rallying ahead of the economic storm clouds.

Japanese Yen Rallies on Trade and Economic Growth Concerns

The Japanese yen today rallied against the US dollar as investors remained worried about the trade tensions between the US and China, which resulted in a risk averse market sentiment. Investors were also worried about the prospects of slower global economic growth next year, which made the safe haven yen more appealing.

Japanese Yen Extends Gains for Sixth Session on Risk Aversion

The Japanese yen continued to rise today, gaining for the sixth consecutive trading session. The currency continued to get support from risk aversion on markets, which made investors stick with safer assets.

Japanese Yen Strong After Fed Announcement Disappoints Markets

The Japanese yen was extremely strong today, rallying against all of its major rivals. Market analysts explained the rally by the reaction to the monetary policy announcement from the Federal Reserve.

Yen Mixed on Japanese Trade Balance, Market Sentiment

The Japanese yen traded mixed today, rising against such currencies as the US dollar and the Swiss franc, but falling versus others, like the euro.

Risk-Averse Environment Helps Yen Gain for Third Day

The Japanese yen rose today, extending its gains for the third consecutive trading session. The main reason for the rally was the negative market sentiment, which made investors seek safer options to park their funds.

Japanese Yen Strengthens Despite Growth Risks, Flat Business Sentiment

The Japanese yen is strengthening against its major rivals to start the trading week. Despite a wide array of factors that should send the currency lower, the yen is continuing momentum from the five sessions. With bitter trade discussions on the horizon, can Tokyo prevent further economic declines in the aftermath of the string of natural disasters?

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